M i s f a c i o

Reblogged from viremi

elena1981:

barrel—rider:

Expectations Vs. Reality / Game of thrones

Reblogged from viremi

tastefullyoffensive:

Conflict of Disinterest [loadingartist]

pricklylegs:

necrophilofthefuture:

Meet Pickles, aka “Catosaurus.” He was rescued in Boston and he’s over 3 feet long.

Adopted!

Reblogged from ghosp

pricklylegs:

necrophilofthefuture:

Meet Pickles, aka “Catosaurus.” He was rescued in Boston and he’s over 3 feet long.

Adopted!

Reblogged from the42istheanswer

federyk-is-a-rising-demon:

bugsuit:

hoonding replied to your post: realtalk ive been drawing wings with v…

yeah your wings are pretty fukkin rad i really need to learn from you on this subject tbh because mine are schiesse

overly simplified method: draw red zigzag first

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important structure reference for when you’re actually putting the feathers on:

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i mostly cheat and just scribble so much you cant see me fucking up the actual feathers but yeah im lazy

THANKS 

Reblogged from the42istheanswer

(Source: cucciolini)

agrippina-minor:

nextdoor-letsgo:

bending-sickle:

camwyn:

tamorapierce:

pyrrhiccomedy:

rebelgoatalliance:

did-you-kno:

Source

Of course it’s Australian.

You always see list of deadliest toxins, but almost never lists of least fun toxins. I mean, a bite from a taipan snake will kill you dead, but in a brisk and orderly fashion that will unfold from “Ow, bugger, what was that” to “x_x” in about an hour.
The reaction to the gympie gympie stinging tree, however, can last for months, during which time there is precious little they can do for you except pump you full of steroids and strap you down to a table with a brace in your mouth so you don’t do yourself serious injury. In the 1960s, British military scientists studied the tree for its potential as a biological weapon.
The research was apparently abandoned, for reasons which have never been released to the public; but if I had to take a guess, I’d look to the example of civilian research scientist Marina Hurley, who spent three years studying the gympie gympie, and was forced to abandon her research when, despite using every manner of precaution, her exposure to the plant’s neurotoxin nevertheless led to hospitalization. The hairs on the plant which carry the toxin, you see, are regularly shed, and become airborne, at which point they can be inhaled and cause severe nosebleeds, asphyxiation, and anaphylactic shock.
One survivor of a brush with a gympie gympie described the stinging persisting for over two years, made worse whenever he took a cold shower.
Sources: 1 2 3 

Writers, here’s an idea.  A grim one, but we can always use those, too.

I was not aware of this tree before, but in retrospect I’m pretty sure this is one more reason why there’s more native Earth life flourishing in post-Combine Australia than on any of the other continents. It wasn’t germs that the Xen things and the Combine were unprepared for. It was stuff like this.
Most of the harmless Australian native life probably died out, mind, but that just left more room for the poisonous things to overwhelm the alien invaders. The resonance cascade just turned Australia into the Kingdom of the Spiders for real.

I thought there couldn’t be anything worse than the box jellyfish of Australia and the Irukandji syndrome…and then this shows up.

Can confirm, have encountered these while hiking. First aid kits in North Queensland where these grow contain wax strips - like, regular leg waxing things, Veet or Nair or whatever - because immediate first aid is to wax the area that touched the tree. There’s no other way to get the needles off your skin - they’re fine and invisible, and brushing/rubbing/scratching only shoves them deeper. These trees are really cool. And also terrifying. They look soft and fluffy, with big soft leaves and thornless easy-to-approach clumps - exactly what you’d want when nature calls in the bush. And the pain doesn’t start straight away. It takes a bit for the needles to get into your skin. You’d be mid-wipe before you realised something was wrong. Hiking in Australia: always talk to the locals first, in short!

Airborne poison hairs: for murder by airbending.

Reblogged from the42istheanswer

agrippina-minor:

nextdoor-letsgo:

bending-sickle:

camwyn:

tamorapierce:

pyrrhiccomedy:

rebelgoatalliance:

did-you-kno:

Source

Of course it’s Australian.

You always see list of deadliest toxins, but almost never lists of least fun toxins. I mean, a bite from a taipan snake will kill you dead, but in a brisk and orderly fashion that will unfold from “Ow, bugger, what was that” to “x_x” in about an hour.

The reaction to the gympie gympie stinging tree, however, can last for months, during which time there is precious little they can do for you except pump you full of steroids and strap you down to a table with a brace in your mouth so you don’t do yourself serious injury. In the 1960s, British military scientists studied the tree for its potential as a biological weapon.

The research was apparently abandoned, for reasons which have never been released to the public; but if I had to take a guess, I’d look to the example of civilian research scientist Marina Hurley, who spent three years studying the gympie gympie, and was forced to abandon her research when, despite using every manner of precaution, her exposure to the plant’s neurotoxin nevertheless led to hospitalization. The hairs on the plant which carry the toxin, you see, are regularly shed, and become airborne, at which point they can be inhaled and cause severe nosebleeds, asphyxiation, and anaphylactic shock.

One survivor of a brush with a gympie gympie described the stinging persisting for over two years, made worse whenever he took a cold shower.

Sources: 1 2 3 

Writers, here’s an idea.  A grim one, but we can always use those, too.

I was not aware of this tree before, but in retrospect I’m pretty sure this is one more reason why there’s more native Earth life flourishing in post-Combine Australia than on any of the other continents. It wasn’t germs that the Xen things and the Combine were unprepared for. It was stuff like this.

Most of the harmless Australian native life probably died out, mind, but that just left more room for the poisonous things to overwhelm the alien invaders. The resonance cascade just turned Australia into the Kingdom of the Spiders for real.

I thought there couldn’t be anything worse than the box jellyfish of Australia and the Irukandji syndrome…and then this shows up.

Can confirm, have encountered these while hiking. First aid kits in North Queensland where these grow contain wax strips - like, regular leg waxing things, Veet or Nair or whatever - because immediate first aid is to wax the area that touched the tree. There’s no other way to get the needles off your skin - they’re fine and invisible, and brushing/rubbing/scratching only shoves them deeper.
These trees are really cool. And also terrifying. They look soft and fluffy, with big soft leaves and thornless easy-to-approach clumps - exactly what you’d want when nature calls in the bush. And the pain doesn’t start straight away. It takes a bit for the needles to get into your skin. You’d be mid-wipe before you realised something was wrong.
Hiking in Australia: always talk to the locals first, in short!

Airborne poison hairs: for murder by airbending.

Reblogged from the42istheanswer

warriorzane:

ultrafacts:

Some Awesome Dog Breeds You’ve Never Heard Of .

See more Ultrafacts

The descriptions though

(Source: ultrafacts)

Reblogged from viria

16stolenxpaperthin:

I've learned everything! And I had to learn it on my own.

The moment you realize that Ozai banishing his eldest son was the best thing he could have done for him.

Thanks for 800!

Reblogged from viria

ekayart:

"What do you think?"

Reblogged from ghosp

auntytany:

lostbeasts:

i will forever be dumbfounded by the SHEER SIZES of some prehistoric animals i mean

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holy

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friggin

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shit

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i still think HORSES are big but

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would you

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just

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cOULD YOU IMAGINE

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FUCK

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